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Battery Isolators

Many installations on board consist of two or more groups of batteries, such as: starter batteries, supply batteries and/or batteries for bow thrusters and navigation devices.
In such installations, it is important that the individual battery groups do not influence each other and are constructed appropriately.
This of course means that the charging system also has to be separated. However, the charging process is more complicated because either the alternator, generator or charger must recharge the batteries individually again.
When selecting diodes/relays, the max. possible charge current must be considered - for example, if your alternator is rated at 50-70 A, the power of the battery isolator would be rated at 70 A.

1. Method
Installing an isolation diode is the easiest thing to do. This robust solution provides the ability to charge up to three batteries simultaneously from an alternator and/or battery charger without connecting the batteries together. As a result, the charge current becomes isolated, meaning a mutual discharge of the starter batteries and the batteries that power the boat's lighting and bowthruster is prevented.
In "normal" isolators, this type of construction results in a voltage drop between 0.3 and 1.2 V. This sounds rather small - but the result is an incomplete charge, wherein the batteries are not charged 100%. The isolators that we offer are Schottky diodes, used with a voltage drop of 0.7 V.

2. Method
Isolators with integrated compensatory diodes. They reduce the voltage drop to almost 0.005 V. For these diodes, a cable from D + alternator on the diode-splitter needs to be installed.

3. Method
The use of electronic charging current distributors. The voltage drop in these distributors is negligible and additionally provides some of these devices with various settings for undervoltage and overvoltage protection, primary charge for the starter battery etc.

4. Method
The use of special relays, which are specially adapted for the use of a battery charge. These devices often offer additional features such as jump-start, undervoltage and overvoltage protection etc.
more Information
ECS charge separators, 3 outputs
ECS charge separators, 2 outputs
Battery Mate
MASTERVOLT
199.95 EUR In stock from €199.95
Charging Relay 12 V / 140 A
Charging Relay 24 V / 140 A
Battery Isolator 120 A
Battery Isolator 70 A

Battery Isolators

Many installations on board consist of two or more groups of batteries, such as: starter batteries, supply batteries and/or batteries for bow thrusters and navigation devices.
In such installations, it is important that the individual battery groups do not influence each other and are constructed appropriately.
This of course means that the charging system also has to be separated. However, the charging process is more complicated because either the alternator, generator or charger must recharge the batteries individually again.
When selecting diodes/relays, the max. possible charge current must be considered - for example, if your alternator is rated at 50-70 A, the power of the battery isolator would be rated at 70 A.

1. Method
Installing an isolation diode is the easiest thing to do. This robust solution provides the ability to charge up to three batteries simultaneously from an alternator and/or battery charger without connecting the batteries together. As a result, the charge current becomes isolated, meaning a mutual discharge of the starter batteries and the batteries that power the boat's lighting and bowthruster is prevented.
In "normal" isolators, this type of construction results in a voltage drop between 0.3 and 1.2 V. This sounds rather small - but the result is an incomplete charge, wherein the batteries are not charged 100%. The isolators that we offer are Schottky diodes, used with a voltage drop of 0.7 V.

2. Method
Isolators with integrated compensatory diodes. They reduce the voltage drop to almost 0.005 V. For these diodes, a cable from D + alternator on the diode-splitter needs to be installed.

3. Method
The use of electronic charging current distributors. The voltage drop in these distributors is negligible and additionally provides some of these devices with various settings for undervoltage and overvoltage protection, primary charge for the starter battery etc.

4. Method
The use of special relays, which are specially adapted for the use of a battery charge. These devices often offer additional features such as jump-start, undervoltage and overvoltage protection etc.

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